top of page

Ilex serrata

Japanese Winterberry

Holly

Comments

A deciduous holly that spreads and suckers to form colonies; dull red berries are very attractive in late autumn once the leaves have fallen; requires moist to wet highly acidic soils, good for problem areas, ideal for naturalizing a space

Description

A deciduous holly that spreads and suckers to form colonies; dull red berries are very attractive in late autumn once the leaves have fallen; requires moist to wet highly acidic soils, good for problem areas, ideal for naturalizing a space

Landscape Attributes

Japanese Winterberry is a multi-stemmed deciduous shrub with an upright spreading habit of growth. Its relatively fine texture sets it apart from other landscape plants with less refined foliage.

This shrub will require occasional maintenance and upkeep, and is best pruned in late winter once the threat of extreme cold has passed. It is a good choice for attracting birds to your yard. Gardeners should be aware of the following characteristic(s) that may warrant special consideration;

Japanese Winterberry is recommended for the following landscape applications;

Mass Planting;Hedges/Screening;General Garden Use;Naturalizing And Woodland Gardens

Planting & Growing

Japanese Winterberry will grow to be about 8 feet tall at maturity, with a spread of 8 feet. It tends to be a little leggy, with a typical clearance of 2 feet from the ground, and is suitable for planting under power lines. It grows at a slow rate, and under ideal conditions can be expected to live for 40 years or more. This is a dioecious species, meaning that individual plants are either male or female. Only the females will produce fruit, and a male variety of the same species is required nearby as a pollinator.

Light Requirement:

partial shade

full sun

Moisture:

moist to wet

Cold Hardy to Zone:

4b

Height(inches):

Spread:

Soil pH:

Soil Type:

8 feet

8 feet

acidic

rich

Deer Resistant:

false

Fall Color

Members of:

bottom of page